Proofreading – Best Custom Essay Writing http://best-custom-essay-writing.net/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 18:28:17 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-1.png Proofreading – Best Custom Essay Writing http://best-custom-essay-writing.net/ 32 32 The Supreme Court tends to save the biggest judgments for last — one constitutional expert explains some good reasons https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/the-supreme-court-tends-to-save-the-biggest-judgments-for-last-one-constitutional-expert-explains-some-good-reasons/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 18:14:52 +0000 https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/the-supreme-court-tends-to-save-the-biggest-judgments-for-last-one-constitutional-expert-explains-some-good-reasons/ (The Conversation is an independent and not-for-profit source for news, analysis, and commentary from academic experts.) (THE TALK) The U.S. Supreme Court on June 23, 2022 overturned a New York law that imposed severe restrictions on carrying a handgun in public. It was a much-anticipated decision as the court will continue to issue opinions before […]]]>

(The Conversation is an independent and not-for-profit source for news, analysis, and commentary from academic experts.)

(THE TALK) The U.S. Supreme Court on June 23, 2022 overturned a New York law that imposed severe restrictions on carrying a handgun in public. It was a much-anticipated decision as the court will continue to issue opinions before the end of its term for the next week or two.

But people have been waiting to see exactly when the court’s ruling in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, which could overturn Roe v. Wade, will be issued.


The court announces on which days it will publish judgments and is not due to announce more until June 24. No one outside the court knows when which key judgments will be released — or if the court might decide to release more opinions by early July.

There’s a reason the court remains so secretive, and why its abortion verdict will likely be one of the last before the court heads into the summer. We asked constitutional scholar and Supreme Court expert Stefanie Lindquist to explain what’s behind the court, which keeps its work top secret.

Does the research support this notion that the court saves the most high-profile judgments for last?

Very careful investigations have been carried out by very respected scholars and judges who have examined the claim that the most important decisions of the court are made late in the term. They measured importance by the extent to which the New York Times reported on the case. And her research has confirmed that it is absolutely correct that the court’s most important decisions – such as those overturning a precedent – are only announced at the end of the term.

One reason may be that the court is particularly careful with the content of these decisions. And because they might have involved more negotiation about the content of the Opinion itself or the extra work of writing dissents and consents.

Is it clear why they publish these important decisions at the end of the term?

There has been some speculation that they may hold off on giving these opinions before leaving town. Being social beings like all of us, some speculate that they don’t want to discuss these cases in their social circles. But I think it’s most likely that it’s a combination of workload and because these cases are more time intensive. The judges also understand the public impact these cases can have. But ultimately, it’s not exactly clear why they do it.

The court is known for its secrecy. What is the point of the court being so secretive about its decisions?

The Court is an institution that over time has been very careful about its legitimacy in the eyes of the public.

The late Judge Antonin Scalia asked his staff to sign an agreement respecting the privacy of the court’s deliberations. He told them that if they violated this secrecy, he would do anything to undermine their future career.

The court takes great care to ensure that an opinion, once given, is the final opinion. Uncovering internal and potentially divisive dynamics surrounding the court’s decision-making process could undermine the force and impact of a Supreme Court decision.

Why don’t they even say when a particular decision will be announced?

I think it’s probably difficult for them, to be honest, to predict the exact timing of decisions. Remember that the court’s final judgments are the result of a negotiation between the individual judges. And until they’re ready, they can’t necessarily say, “This is the day we say goodbye,” especially at the end of the semester when a lot of these very important decisions are being announced.

Negotiations and corrections can take place up to the last minute. The judges will no doubt appreciate that these extremely important decisions will make their way into law school textbooks. They are carefully read by journalists. And the judges are a highly professional group of individuals.

So they are concerned about any opinion they give. But with those opinions they give at the end of the semester, those tend to be the most important decisions they make — they’re even more anxious to be precise in every sentence they write

This article was republished by The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article here: https://theconversation.com/the-supreme-court-tends-to-save-the-biggest-rulings-for-last-a-constitutional-expert-explains-a-few-good-reasons-185684.

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Burnham-On-Sea author, 96, celebrates the publication of her first novel https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/burnham-on-sea-author-96-celebrates-the-publication-of-her-first-novel/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 23:09:57 +0000 https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/burnham-on-sea-author-96-celebrates-the-publication-of-her-first-novel/ Burnham-On-Sea’s oldest author is celebrating the release of her first book in paperback this month. Sheila Rainey, 96, who is visually impaired, has enjoyed writing for years and has now published her latest novel, Innocents In London, after encouragement from a friend. We reported here that Sheila’s novel has sold enough copies on Amazon’s Kindle […]]]>

Burnham-On-Sea’s oldest author is celebrating the release of her first book in paperback this month.

Sheila Rainey, 96, who is visually impaired, has enjoyed writing for years and has now published her latest novel, Innocents In London, after encouragement from a friend.

We reported here that Sheila’s novel has sold enough copies on Amazon’s Kindle service to be published in physical book form – which has now happened.

“I’ve always loved to write – it keeps the mind sharp – and this is my first published book,” she told Burnham-On-Sea.com. “It’s very exciting to have my work available in book form and on Amazon.”

The historical novel, which Sheila worked on for about six months, is set in the 19th century and is a tale of hope and adversity. It follows a five year old boy whose mother died and he is abducted from his father’s country estate and finds himself ’employed’ as a climbing chimney sweep in Georgian London.

Sheila, who has lived at the Kathleen Chambers House care home in Burnham for over five years, was celebrated with a celebration by staff and friends this week to mark the release.

“A dear friend and editor Logan persuaded me to get published after enjoying what I had written.”

Judy Davies, a friend of Sheila’s, adds: “It is a wonderful book – a real game changer, fascinating, very exciting and a most extraordinary story. She is a remarkable woman.”

The 282-page book is available from Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

A music lover, Sheila has worked with major orchestras and conductors including the Philharmonia, the English Chamber Orchestra and the BBC Academy, accompanying them at all concerts in the UK and abroad.

During her time at BBC Publications she prepared, commissioned and edited printed programs for concerts. A lifelong lover of literature, she wrote articles and stories for house and local magazines in her spare time.

A traffic accident in 1981 resulted in serious leg injuries and an inability to work for several months. She then got a job as a receptionist at the naturalist Gilbert White’s museum in Selborn. During the winter months she cataloged the Holt White archives, including the series of letters from Gilbert White’s niece Mary to her brother Thomas Holt White. She prepared a transcription of the letters for an M.Phil. Degree awarded in 1990.

Sheila moved to Eastbury, near Lambourn, where she worked freelance for a Newbury publisher, Countryside Books, editing, proofreading and indexing. Poor eyesight forced her to give up this job.

It was in Eastbury that she began her Shefford series of crime novels. After moving to Froxfield she continued to write the Shefford novels and it was here that Innocents in London was born.

Sheila now lives at Kathleen Chambers House, a care home for the blind and visually impaired. Despite having vision problems, she continued to revise Innocents in London and the Shefford series during the Covid lockdowns, writing ‘Alec in Blunderland’ – Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland seen by a grumpy, complaining old man!

She hopes to celebrate her 97th birthday in August and plans to continue writing as long as her wits and eyesight allow.

Click here to order a copy of the book from Amazon

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A view of the DC swamp https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/a-view-of-the-dc-swamp/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 13:03:06 +0000 https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/a-view-of-the-dc-swamp/ comment Critics of federal agencies won a small victory June 15 in the Supreme Court with the judges’ unanimous decision in American Hospital Association v. Becerra (pdf). Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s testimony for the court offers, perhaps inadvertently, some revealing views of the DC swamp: ridiculous legal complexities, absurdities in a grand federal social program, and […]]]>

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Critics of federal agencies won a small victory June 15 in the Supreme Court with the judges’ unanimous decision in American Hospital Association v. Becerra (pdf).

Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s testimony for the court offers, perhaps inadvertently, some revealing views of the DC swamp: ridiculous legal complexities, absurdities in a grand federal social program, and crude special-interest politics.

That American Hospital The case arose because (1) rural hospitals tried to get $ 1.6 billion in additional Medicare money annually, and (2) the US Ministry of Health (HHS) went too far in trying to stop them was.

A first look into the swamp: Medicare

Medicare is the second largest state program. (Disclosure: I’m enrolled in Medicare because federal law requires it.) It shows how social issues at the federal level are almost always counterproductive, how they drive up spending, and how — under existing swamp protocols — they almost always are to grow.

Medicare’s early sponsors advertised it as a low-cost program that covered hospitalizations. Now it devours about an eighth of the entire federal budget. Despite its enormous tax base, the program is approximate four years Away from bankruptcy.

Medicare has played an important role in driving healthcare costs from reasonably affordable levels to stratospheric levels that few can afford. This, in turn, leaves millions of Americans desperate for Medicare — mired in red tape, so to speak.

In addition to hospitalizations, Medicare is now paying hospitals to give away free prescription drugs to people who are Not hospitalized. Why? For in 2003, a supposedly “conservative” Republican Congress expanded the already gargantuan program, and a supposedly “conservative” Republican President, George W. Bush, signed it into law. (Yes, I know there were arguments for enlargement, but there were better arguments for market alternatives.)

Next Look at the Goo: The Medicare Statute

If you examine the Congressional Medicare Statute, you’ll learn more about the DC swamp. The law is unimaginably complex. This ensures that almost nobody outside of the DC Beltway (except for a few special interests) has any idea what it means. A single section of the law – the “Benefits” section – is over 32,000 words. That’s as long as a humble book.

The Payment of Benefits section contains a dizzying array of subdivisions. Look at the following example: Conventional laws are divided into sections and sub -sections, so that a typical reference “Section 2 (a)” or perhaps “Section 2 (A) (II)” could be. But the legislation in question in the American Hospital The case was “United States Code, Title 42, Chapter 7, Subchapter XVIII, Section 1395l

In addition, you can add government regulations.

Another look: Marsh Critters pay

In which American Hospitals In this case, the Supreme Court had to interpret the statute that defines how federal agencies reimburse hospitals for dispensing free medicines.

The law states that HHS has two options. The first option is to pay hospitals 106 percent of the drug’s average retail price. This is a really good deal for the hospitals: any volume discounts are not adjusted, and they also collect a 6 percent profit. This motivates them to give out as many free medicines as possible. As you can see, the hospital and pharmaceutical lobbies are in the swamp.

The law’s second reimbursement option requires HHS to conduct a survey to find out what hospitals are actually paying for the drugs. Then HHS can refund based on that. This could save some money. But if the American Hospitals case occurred in 2018, HHS had never conducted a survey.

Price controls in the swamp

You might think price controls are a thing of the past because they proved their futility during the Nixon and Carter administrations. If so, then you don’t know the swamp. Another part of the Medicare law forces drug companies to sell their products at a fixed discount to preferred hospitals — “340B hospitals” in swamp jargon. These are (supposedly) hospitals that serve low-income or rural communities.

Under the 106 percent reimbursement formula, 340B hospitals can feast like alligators: they receive 106 percent of the normal price of drugs and pay just 77.5 percent. Of course, the lobbyists of the 340B hospitals have a heartbreaking justification for this untenable situation. They always do. This is how the court described it:

“[T]340B hospitals claimed that lowering their prescription drug reimbursement rates would force those hospitals to scrap or drastically scale back other key programs that provide a wide range of medical services in low-income and rural communities — like treatments for cancer, mental health issues, opioid addiction and diabetes.”

That sounds appealing. However, this overlooks the fact that almost all other hospitals also have to treat patients with these symptoms. It also overlooks the medical needs of non-Medicare citizens, most of whom have to pay their own healthcare costs and federal taxes.

More from the swamp: HHS is trying to respond

HHS responded to this situation by lowering the prescription drug reimbursement rate for 340 billion hospitals to reflect the cost reduction received.

HHS’s response would have saved about $1.6 billion per year. It was probably the right thing. But if you think doing the “right” thing would save taxpayers money or reduce the deficit, guess again. The court’s opinion states that any savings “would be reallocated by law to other Medicare services.” In other words, it would allow HHS bureaucrats to redirect the money to projects they prefer.

The legal problem with the HHS maneuver was the following: At first glance, the law HHS only gives the authority to differentiate between hospitals if the agency first carries out a costs. And as I said before, HHS had never conducted an expense survey.

The Court’s Decision

Finally, we come to the small victory against the administrative state: In 1984 the Supreme Court ruled in Chevron v. Natural Resources Defense Council (pdf). That rafters The ruling said that when a law is not clear about how much authority the agency has, the agency – not a court – decides the issue. The Agency’s decision must be ‘reasonable’, but in practice its decision is usually final.

Justice Kavanaugh is known for being a critic of rafters. He believes that a power-seeking government agency should not be the judge in its own case.

in the American Hospital, HHS argued that it was a reasonable interpretation of the law to reimburse hospitals at different rates. But the court did not turn rafters. The court merely said the HHS view was legally incorrect. This could be a sign that the rafters Dominion is on the way out.

It says a lot about the swamp that the case that drained the bureaucrats’ powers was one where they were probably trying to do the right thing.

Another sign of the Slough? A poorly worded statement

The reasons for the judges American Hospital decision could probably have been explained in three or four pages. Instead, the statement 14 is quite repetitive: For example, the two reimbursement options of HHS (average sales price or cost collection) are described four times.

Another sign of sloppy wording is the use of the word “data” in the statement. Strictly speaking, “dates” is the plural form of “date”. So, one should say “this date is” and “these dates are”.

The Medicare Statute correctly treats “dates” as the plural form. But the opinion of the court varies. On page 3, the Opinion treats it as singular (“this data” and not “this data”). This happens again on page 9. But later on page 9 the word is treated in the plural (“data are”) and it remains so on page 10 (“data…help”) and page 13 (“data justify”).

Why the mess? We will never know. It looks like several paws were mistreated during the design phase. And someone who was supposed to proofread or edit the result didn’t do a very good job.

Regardless, The Swamp is guilty of far worse.

The views expressed in this article are the author’s and do not necessarily reflect the views of The Epoch Times.

consequences

Robert G. Natelson, a former professor of constitutional law, is a senior fellow in constitutional law at the Independence Institute in Denver.

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Proofreading Matters – AlbertaPrimeTimes.com https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/proofreading-matters-albertaprimetimes-com/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 15:00:00 +0000 https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/proofreading-matters-albertaprimetimes-com/ The world of instant messaging has seen some major spelling mistakes. Often my cell phone technology will replace the word I wrote with a word it thinks I meant to write. As a result, I sent some pretty strange notes to family and friends. Most people are friendly about it. Some say nothing, decipher a […]]]>

The world of instant messaging has seen some major spelling mistakes. Often my cell phone technology will replace the word I wrote with a word it thinks I meant to write. As a result, I sent some pretty strange notes to family and friends. Most people are friendly about it. Some say nothing, decipher a little and move on. Not my son Justin. He always asks me about it. Pretty sarcastic, I might add. Maybe next time I’ll think about proofreading. Here’s a sample taken straight from my phone.

Me: “Come on Justin, I’m going to splash with the grandkids.”

Justin: “I see. Thank you for teaching them the intricacies of food presentation.”

Me: “PLAY! I’ll play with them! Sheesh.”

I got it wrong so many times that he felt compelled to point out that I must be writing a bunch of lousy text messages for someone who considers himself a writer. He wasn’t wrong.

I see funny phrases written by cute, well-meaning kids every day at school. Just like me, they don’t want to misspell words. Their intentions are pure, but their meaning is lost in translation. It often boils down to omitting a tiny letter.

Here are a few examples.

-Jim went home, ate a snake and watched TV.

It’s reasonable to assume Jim didn’t actually eat a snake while relaxing in front of the TV. Instead, he probably ate a snack. However, the image of Jim eating a snake after school paints a far more interesting picture.

-The turkeys were very holy and ran away.

Since that memorable sentence was written around Thanksgiving, I can safely say the turkeys were more scared than holy. Otherwise, eating said birds could border on blasphemy.

– We used chicken balls to flavor our soup.

Correct me if I’m wrong, but while chicken bouillon is a flavorful broth, I have a feeling that incorporating the farmyard chicken rolls into a soup or other dish would not enhance the flavor. It would also not meet Canadian food safety standards.

-Dark Vader put on his glasses.

Obviously, Dark Vader must be Darth’s brother, and no doubt wearing his glasses must be a secret code known only to these two insidious villains.

Last week children learned to underline dialogue by copying a sentence from the blackboard. Spelling always counts, of course, but it wasn’t the focus of this lesson until I read a child’s interpretation of the following sentence.

“Cool shirt,” Sue said.

I read over this young girl’s shoulder and watched her print the line.

“Cool shit,” Sue said.

Unfortunately, it wasn’t the same at all. Notice how a small letter can make all the difference? We quickly found an eraser.

Yes, it’s easy to see how simple mistakes can be made with a missing or swapped letter, but doesn’t that make it all the more interesting? None of these sentences would otherwise have made headlines. While they command attention, they underscore the need for a renewed commitment to proofreading before sending your words out into the world.

Your Turley,

Helen

Helen lives on the family farm near Marshall, Saskatchewan, where she works as an author, columnist and in education. Find her online at helentoews.com. There you can find out more about her humorous Prairie Wool Books or the newly released fantasy series Runestaff Chronicles.

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🌱 YMCA Needs More Lifeguards + Bank Donates $2.5M to UNC Charlotte https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/%f0%9f%8c%b1-ymca-needs-more-lifeguards-bank-donates-2-5m-to-unc-charlotte/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 21:59:12 +0000 https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/%f0%9f%8c%b1-ymca-needs-more-lifeguards-bank-donates-2-5m-to-unc-charlotte/ Hello and happy Friday! I’ll be back in your inbox this morning to walk you through everything you need to know about what’s happening on the ground. Let’s do it. First today’s weather: Record-breaking temperatures. High: 101 Low: 72. Here are the five best stories in Charlotte today: Charlotte YMCA wants to hire more lifeguards […]]]>

Hello and happy Friday! I’ll be back in your inbox this morning to walk you through everything you need to know about what’s happening on the ground. Let’s do it.


First today’s weather:

Record-breaking temperatures. High: 101 Low: 72.


Here are the five best stories in Charlotte today:

  1. Charlotte YMCA wants to hire more lifeguards because this year’s shortage is a little worse than last year. Typically, the YMCA needs between 600 and 800 lifeguards to guard the people in the pools at its 17 branches and camps. A lifeguard shortage means operating hours for any pool that isn’t adequately covered will have to be curtailed. (Spectrum News)
  2. A 66-year-old man from Buxton died Wednesday after being pulled from the surf at Cape Hatteras National Seashore. The man collapsed on the beach after being rescued from the sea by bystanders, who immediately began CPR. EMTs’ CPR and resuscitation efforts failed to prevent his death. (Spectrum News)
  3. Bank of America hopes to expand UNC Charlotte’s Signature Bridge program for historically underrepresented students and support the creation of a Community Innovation Incubator with a $2.5 million investment. According to WBTV, “The University Transition Opportunities Program will add an additional 300 students to UNC Charlotte’s Bridge program over a five-year period.” TIts $2.5 million investment “aligns with many important and critical components of the recently launched university 10-year strategic plan to “shape what comes next” through research, teaching, leadership, and diversity and inclusion.” (WBTV)
  4. Dumpster Fathers Charlotte NC provides an affordable, reliable and consistent dumpster rental service in this city and adjacent areas. They say it is a waste disposal alternative for various construction and home improvement projects. This company has become the preferred dumpster rental provider in the area as they offer reliable dumpster rentals to homeowners, investors and business owners. (digital journal)
  5. earlier this week, Mangasha Dion Clark, Jr. pleaded guilty to his role in the January 2017 murder of 14-year-old Anthony Frazier in Charlotte. He’s guilty of second-degree murder. Judge W. Robert Bell sentenced Clark to 150 to 192 months in prison. (WBTV)

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Today in Charlotte:

  • Charlotte Job Fair at Junior Achievement of Central Carolinas (11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m)
  • Appearance of Greg Steinfeld at the Optimist Hall (17:30)
  • Juneteenth Jam at the Belk Theater (6:30 p.m)
  • Candlelight: A Tribute to ABBA at The Barrel Room at Triple C Brewing (19.00)
  • Cody Johnson & Friends at the Charlotte Metro Credit Union Amphitheater (19.00)
  • The Only $15 Sip & Paint (R&B Edition) at Bobbee O’s BBQ (9:00 p.m.)

From my notebook:

  • Charlotte City Council voted unanimously to approve changes to a city transportation policy aimed at ensuring that residents of rental properties have equal opportunities to improve road safety in the neighborhood. (City of Charlotte Government via Facebook)
  • Happy retirement, Tracy! The Children’s Theater of Charlotte would like to thank you for 24 years of outstanding service to us. They have accompanied us through many transitions and helped us grow into what we are today. We will miss you. (Charlotte Children’s Theater via Facebook)
  • Summer Bridge is a FREE learning and high school transition opportunity for eligible up-and-coming ninth graders. Focus: Math 1 Success, College & Career Exploration and High School Planning. Check eligibility and register. (Charlotte-Mecklenburg-Schools via Facebook)
  • My thermostat is set to 60 but the temp still reads and feels like 76 degrees. Would anyone give me any recommendations on home air conditioner repairs? (Next door)
  • Please stop walking your dog in this heat (not even during the hottest part of the day in summer). Take your dogs out early in the morning. (Next door)
  • My cousin is missing here in NC after learning of his father’s death. If you see him or know anything of his whereabouts, please call or text me at (585) 503-2396. (Next door)
  • Our sweet gray kitten is missing. Did you see him? Spot is about 1.5 years old and is very loved by his owner and our whole family. He is very cute and was previously thought to be a stray. (Next door)
  • We need to either repair or replace one of our HVAC systems. We got an offer from Morris Jenkins who wanted to tell us it would be $25,000! Anyone have a recommendation? (Next door)
  • My dog ​​walker found this baby not long ago and was wondering if it’s someone’s dog. He is currently safe and sound at my house. I gave him food and water. If he is your dog, please let me know. I will take him to a vet. (Next door)
  • Can anyone recommend a reliable irrigation repair shop? Mine has leaked. (Next door)
  • I’m a reporter at the WSOC. I’ve worked hard to tell stories in the neighborhoods near me. Please let me know if you are aware of an issue that needs your attention or a situation worthy of reporting. (Next door)

More from our sponsors – thanks for supporting local news!

Events:


You’re all caught up for today! See you tomorrow morning for your next update.

Alexis Goering

About me: My name is Alexis A. Goring. I’m an East Coast girl with a pulse for people, news and reports! I’ve been a freelance writer/editor/proofreader in the media industry for 15 years. I’m also a published author, seasoned blogger, and founder of Writer at Heart Editorial Services. You can find out more about me and my work on my website. Here is the link: https://alexisagoring.jimdofree.com.

Have a news tip or suggestion for an upcoming Charlotte Daily? Contact me at charlotte@patch.com

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10 Essay Writing Tips for College Students – Don’t pay anyone to write your work! https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/10-essay-writing-tips-for-college-students-dont-pay-anyone-to-write-your-work/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 11:39:25 +0000 https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/10-essay-writing-tips-for-college-students-dont-pay-anyone-to-write-your-work/ A college essay is one of the most important writing assignments you will ever face, both academically and professionally. This task requires thorough research, reading and understanding of the material, as well as your own creativity and insight into the subject at hand. How are you supposed to manage all this and still manage classes, […]]]>


A college essay is one of the most important writing assignments you will ever face, both academically and professionally. This task requires thorough research, reading and understanding of the material, as well as your own creativity and insight into the subject at hand. How are you supposed to manage all this and still manage classes, exams, internships, extracurricular activities, etc.? You definitely can’t – and that’s why you should pay someone to write your work instead of trying to write it all by yourself! Here are 10 essay writing tips for college students.

1) Create an outline

Before you start writing your college essay, make sure you have your thoughts organized by jotting down some bullet points on paper or typing them into a word processor. The easiest way to get started is to create an outline that will walk you through the creation of each paragraph and show where each piece of information goes.

2) Start with an interesting hook

It is important that you immediately grab your reader’s attention. It’s been said many times before, but it’s really true that you only have a few sentences to captivate a reader and make them want to read more. One of our favorite ways to write an essay is to start with an interesting quote or fact and then add some of your own opinion.

3) Use real life examples, not what you read in books

It might seem like you can get away with examples from books or other reading, but that might not work when you’re writing an essay. The easiest way to write a great essay is to use examples from your own life. This will show your unique perspective and will set you apart as an exceptional writer.

4) Providing analysis and evidence

Take a step back and look at your essay. Have you provided enough analysis and evidence to prove your position? If not, go back and add more. Because if your essay can’t prove your point—and all essays try to do that—then maybe you don’t even write it. To understand how to provide powerful analysis and evidence, read Chapter 3 of the Bedford Guide for Writers.

What’s Next: Make sure you leave enough space in your essay to include any additional thoughts or points you want to make about your topic. This is also an opportunity to make sure it all makes sense together; There should be no contradictions between sections or paragraphs in your essay.

5) Use appropriate citations

Even if you’re not an experienced writer, you can most likely recall at least one instance where a citation was used effectively. Regardless of what you think of citations, they are incredibly useful when placed in an essay. Quotes can serve as examples or sources of inspiration, but most importantly, they make your writing more interesting.

6) Proofread thoroughly before submitting

Too often, students rush through the proofreading of their work. This leads to a series of errors in spelling, grammar, and even bigger problems. Do yourself a favour: take the time to review your work before submitting it. A few extra minutes can save you hours of editing later.

7) Create a powerful ending

The end of an essay is often just as important as the beginning. You have one last chance to convince your reader that you know what you’re talking about, and a poorly executed conclusion will cost you points. So that I don’t screw up anything here, I prefer to do it sometimes pay someone to write my work.

8) Save time researching online sources

You can only avoid plagiarism by doing intensive research and carefully citing your sources. So if you’re still paying someone to write your work, chances are you’re simply looking for a shortcut to save time and do well on your assignments. However, there is no quicker way to get a bad grade or get kicked out of college than by cheating.

9) Practice writing several times a week

It’s good practice to write an essay a few times a week so you don’t forget your essay writing skills. Just try your best and write several times a week – even if it’s only 10 minutes each time. The more you write, the better you become.

For more articles see OD blog.

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6 tips on how to get personal grants https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/6-tips-on-how-to-get-personal-grants/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 22:25:34 +0000 https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/6-tips-on-how-to-get-personal-grants/ A grant is an award of money or other resources made by a government, organization, or individual to support a specific activity or project. Grants are typically non-refundable, meaning the recipient does not have to repay the funds awarded. If you are a person in need of financial assistance, you may be wondering if there […]]]>

A grant is an award of money or other resources made by a government, organization, or individual to support a specific activity or project.

Grants are typically non-refundable, meaning the recipient does not have to repay the funds awarded.

If you are a person in need of financial assistance, you may be wondering if there is such a thing as a personal grant. The answer is yes – there are many different types of personal grants, each with their own specific eligibility requirements.

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Here are 6 tips on how to get personal grants:

1. Do your research

There are many different types of scholarships, so it is important that you do your research and find the ones that best suit your needs. First, search online or contact your local government agency. Then, narrow down your options by considering the eligibility requirements and application process for each scholarship.

For example, some grants may only be available to certain individuals, e.g. B. low earners or people with disabilities. Others may have specific requirements, e.g. B. when they buy their own home for the first time or attend a certain school.

Additionally, some scholarships may have a competitive application process, while others may be easier. There can be differences Personal grants for women and men. It is important that you know what you are getting into before beginning the application process so that you can increase your chances of being awarded the scholarship.

2. Consider your options

Once you’ve completed your research and narrowed down your options, it’s time to start thinking about which grants to apply for. Think about your needs and goals, and choose the grants that will best help you achieve them.

For example, if you are a student struggling to pay for college, you should look for scholarships that can help cover tuition or other expenses. For example, the Federal Pell Grant is a need-based grant that provides financial assistance to low-income students enrolled in college.

Or if you’re a single parent trying to get back on your feet after a divorce, you may want to apply for grants that can help with housing or living expenses. Also, there are many scholarships specifically for women, so check those out too.

3. Read the requirements carefully

Before applying for a grant, it is important to read the requirements carefully and ensure you meet all eligibility criteria. Remember, even if you think you are a good candidate for the scholarship, if you do not meet the requirements, your application will likely be rejected.

So take the time to read through the requirements and make sure you understand them before you start completing the application. For example, many scholarships require you to have a certain level of financial need. Therefore, before applying, check whether you have to fulfill these requirements.

Likewise, many scholarships have deadlines that you must be aware of. Be sure to note the deadline and make sure you submit your application by then.

4. Gather all the required documents

After reading the requirements and verifying that you are are entitled to the grant, it’s time to gather all the necessary documents. This can include things like your tax returns, payslips, bank statements, and other financial documents.

In addition, you may also be required to provide personal essays or letters of recommendation. It’s important to have all of these things ready before you start completing the application so that you can easily add them when prompted.

Also, make sure you have all the required documents before submitting your application. Missing even one document can delay the process or result in your application being denied. For example, if you’re applying for a grant that requires tax returns, make sure you have your most recent ones to hand.

5. Complete the application

When you have all the required documents, you can start filling out the application. Take your time and fill out the application carefully. Remember, this is your chance to show why you deserve the scholarship, so you want to make a good impression.

Also, be sure to proofread your application before submitting it. This will ensure that there are no errors or typos that could result in your application being rejected.

Basically, when filling out the application, you should simply take your time and be as detailed as possible. The more information you can provide, the better your chances of receiving a grant. Be on the lookout for any required essays or letters of recommendation and be sure to include them when prompted. Everything else should be straightforward.

6. Submit your application

After you’ve double-checked your application and made sure everything is in order, it’s time to submit it. Make sure you submit your application in time for it to be reviewed.

Also, keep a copy of your application and all required documents for your records. This comes in handy when you need to track your application or when there are problems with it.

If you are selected as a recipient of the grant, other copies may also be required. Things like tax returns may also need to be filed, so have those ready as well.

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Scholarships can be a great way to help you achieve your goals, whether they are personal or professional. However, it can be difficult to know which scholarships are best for you and how to apply for them. In summary, the best way to find personal scholarships is to do your research, read the requirements carefully and gather all the required documents before you start to fill out the application. If you follow these tips, you will increase your chances of getting a promotion.

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How I got into law school: Black students should choose this “Reach” school, says Kristine B. Abrenica of Kasowitz Benson Torres https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/how-i-got-into-law-school-black-students-should-choose-this-reach-school-says-kristine-b-abrenica-of-kasowitz-benson-torres/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 22:07:43 +0000 https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/how-i-got-into-law-school-black-students-should-choose-this-reach-school-says-kristine-b-abrenica-of-kasowitz-benson-torres/ Welcome to Law.com’s How I Got Into Law School series, bringing practical advice to the next generation of law students on the law school application process. From preparing for the LSAT to deciding what to write in their personal statements, future 1Ls will find new ways to approach the application process directly from people who […]]]>

Welcome to Law.com’s How I Got Into Law School series, bringing practical advice to the next generation of law students on the law school application process. From preparing for the LSAT to deciding what to write in their personal statements, future 1Ls will find new ways to approach the application process directly from people who have been in their shoes. Would you like to share your experience? Email Carley Beckum at [email protected]

Kristine B. Abrenica, associate at Kasowitz Benson Torres

Law school attended: George Washington University Law School

Tell us about the process of the LSAT. did you feel safe Did you feel well prepared? How did you feel after the test? At the end of my sophomore year at City College of New York, I was accepted into an honors program sponsored by a law firm. The program offered LSAT prep classes during the summer between my sophomore and junior years and during my junior year of college. The preparatory courses broke down the LSAT for us and gave us many opportunities to complete practical tests under real test conditions. I found it difficult to balance the LSAT prep with my work schedule and college course load. I ended up doing the LSAT twice. On the eve of my first exam, I felt more confident and better prepared than when I did my first assessment test. However, both times I felt extremely nervous and unprepared after taking the test.

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George Ellsworth Whittle, Jr., 79 https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/george-ellsworth-whittle-jr-79/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 14:02:25 +0000 https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/george-ellsworth-whittle-jr-79/ WILMNINGTON — George Ellsworth Whittle, Jr., 79, of Wilmington, NC, died at his home on June 5, 2022. He was born on November 17, 1942 in Baltimore, Maryland to the late George Ellsworth Whittle, Sr. and Otelia Alberta Waltemmeyer. George worked as a typesetter and proofreader at a government printing office, where he became editor […]]]>

WILMNINGTON — George Ellsworth Whittle, Jr., 79, of Wilmington, NC, died at his home on June 5, 2022. He was born on November 17, 1942 in Baltimore, Maryland to the late George Ellsworth Whittle, Sr. and Otelia Alberta Waltemmeyer.

George worked as a typesetter and proofreader at a government printing office, where he became editor of the US Senate Committee on Banking and Urban Affairs. After retiring, he moved to North Carolina with his wife Ann.

George is preceded in death by his wife Ann Whittle; his parents, George Ellsworth Whittle, Sr. and Otelia “Tillie” Alberta Waltemyer; and sister, Jean Whittle Rush.

He is survived by his stepson, James W. Vinyard (Kristen); grandsons, Aaron Vinyard and Rachel Vinyard; niece, Sue Clark (Tom); nephew Rob Cook; a great-niece and a great-nephew; and many dear friends.

A memorial service will be held on Tuesday, June 14, 2022 at 4:00 p.m. at the Wrightsville Beach United Methodist Church at 4 Live Oak Dr., Wrightsville Beach, NC 28480, NC.

In lieu of flowers, please consider making a donation in George’s honor to Nourish, NC, a local foundation dedicated to feeding young children. Donations are possible at: https://nourishnc.org/donate/.

Sending condolences to family online, herein the guest book.

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Navicky wins literary prize https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/navicky-wins-literary-prize/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 14:37:58 +0000 https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/navicky-wins-literary-prize/ Navicky wins Literary Book Award Jefferson Navicky, a 1994 graduate of Cambridge High School, recently won the 2022 Maine Literary Book Award for Poetry for his recently published book, Antique Densities: Modern Parables & Other Experiments in Short Prose. The book was proofread by Navicky’s mother Jen Navicky of New Concord and is dedicated to […]]]>

Navicky wins Literary Book Award

Jefferson Navicky, a 1994 graduate of Cambridge High School, recently won the 2022 Maine Literary Book Award for Poetry for his recently published book, Antique Densities: Modern Parables & Other Experiments in Short Prose. The book was proofread by Navicky’s mother Jen Navicky of New Concord and is dedicated to Navicky’s brother Scott, a 1995 graduate of Cambridge High School.

MVESC Board of Directors meets in Zanesville

The Muskingum Valley Educational Service Center Board of Directors will hold its regular June board meeting Monday at 7:00 p.m. at the Muskingum Valley ESC office, 205 N. Seventh Street, Zanesville.

Plat books now available

Guernsey County Plat books are available. The book contains the standard property map pages showing communities and areas within the county, including property lines for all rural parcels. Along with land tenure maps are the new enhanced LiDAR aerial maps, which show a 3D-like topographical view of the local land.

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