Writing Assistants – Best Custom Essay Writing http://best-custom-essay-writing.net/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 23:20:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-1.png Writing Assistants – Best Custom Essay Writing http://best-custom-essay-writing.net/ 32 32 VHSL celebrates 50 years of Title IX | Sports https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/vhsl-celebrates-50-years-of-title-ix-sports/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 23:20:00 +0000 https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/vhsl-celebrates-50-years-of-title-ix-sports/ Virginia High School League development director Hannah Catherine Munro called Title IX “The 37 Most Important Words for Women in Athletics.” Reiley Fitzpatrick, the 2022 VHSL Class 5 Athlete of the Year from Independence High School, could hardly hold back tears as she presented official legislation Thursday afternoon during a special ceremony marking Virginia’s 50th […]]]>

Virginia High School League development director Hannah Catherine Munro called Title IX “The 37 Most Important Words for Women in Athletics.”

Reiley Fitzpatrick, the 2022 VHSL Class 5 Athlete of the Year from Independence High School, could hardly hold back tears as she presented official legislation Thursday afternoon during a special ceremony marking Virginia’s 50th birthday.

Title IX, a federal statute passed as part of the Education Amendments of 1972, was a continuation of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. It reads: “No person in the United States shall be disqualified by reason of sex from participating in any educational program or activity which have received federal financial assistance, are denied the benefits, or are discriminated against in the context of educational programs or activities.

“I played sports in high school, college and for work, and I just can’t imagine my life without sports,” said UVa athletic director Carla Williams. “Yet before Title IX, dreams remained unfulfilled, physical talents lay dormant and untapped, leadership, organizational and managerial skills remained untapped. This should not have been the case and we must be vigilant to ensure this never happens again.”

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More than 200 people descended on the Alumni Hall on Thursday to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the passage of the historic law. As part of the event, Sam Brunelle, former William Monroe High School standout and current Virginia basketball player, served as moderator for a panel of athletes and administrators who have helped pave the way for equality in women’s sports.

“I’m very excited to have the opportunity to speak to three great women who came before me and laid the groundwork for me to take advantage of all the benefits, all the really great things that come with Division I women’s basketball ,” Brunelle said. “I think it’s great to step back and hear their stories and understand what it took to lay those foundations.”

Panelists included Yori Hightower-Boothe, a two-time Olympic field hockey player and All-American at Old Dominion University, Vivian Greene Brown, a basketball player who was the first female athlete to receive a scholarship to Norfolk State University, and Kim Record, associate athletic director of UVa for external operations and deputy Title IX officer for the department.

“Each and every one of you has taken steps to help us get where we have been,” Hightower-Boothe said. “When I talk about what brought me here, my parents always told me that you can be anything you want to be and it doesn’t matter. My father always told me everything [sport] I made my decision, I had to go out there and play hard.

A multisport standout at Kempsville High School in Virginia Beach, Hightower-Boothe found her calling on the field with the ODU field hockey team. She led the Monarchs to the national title in 1982 and is a member of the Virginia Sports Hall of Fame and the ODU Hall of Fame.

“Staying involved is the most important thing,” Hightower-Boothe said. “Another way for us women to express ourselves is athletic, smart, everything, but just don’t give up. Keep playing, keep fighting and get involved. Someone has to be first, but don’t be last. Never be the last.”

Brown’s athletic career began in the early stages of Title IX. After a distinguished basketball career at Smithfield High School, her success continued on the hardwood at Norfolk State, where she led the Spartans to the program’s first conference title in 1975, the first year of its existence. She then played professionally in the original Women’s Basketball League for the Dayton Rockettes, St. Louis Streaks and Milwaukee Wranglers.

“There were a lot of things that weren’t fair, but it was an opportunity,” Brown said. “The fight is still there and there is still a lot to do. Everything is always a struggle at the beginning, but if you persevere to the end, you will reap the rewards.”

She averaged 25.1 points throughout her collegiate career and won a professional championship title with the Wranglers in her inaugural season.

“It’s always a struggle in the beginning,” Brown said. “I’m grateful that I was there from the start. I was there to see something begin. It wasn’t fun, but I was there. I can look back and say: I made it. I like to tell my story.”

Record made a name for themselves on the administrative side of athletics. The UVa graduate became North Carolina-Greensboro’s first female athletic director and served in the role for 12 seasons. Prior to that, the Fluvanna County native spent 13 seasons at Florida State University, where she oversaw the men’s basketball program and the women’s soccer and basketball programs and oversaw Title IX compliance before starting her current job at UVa.

“As I sat in this room today, I was one of the first women athletic directors in Division I, and at the time it was less than 5 percent,” Record said. “I can now sit here, back at the University of Virginia, and work with Carla Williams, the first woman of color at a Power 5 school. It’s not because of her skin color. It’s not because of her gender. It’s because she’s damn good. The first piece is when we stop talking about being first and it’s the new normal. It does not matter. That’s probably the next step. You’re the athletic director, period, and you’re good.”

Still, Record’s tenure as Administrator has had its challenges. She recalled some difficult moments during her tenure at Tallahassee.

“It was the first time I felt like I had a big ‘W’ on my chest,” Record said. “You are the woman person. You’re the person who handles all the girl stuff.”

Record said it was difficult for a 33-year-old to find her way. However, she credited great mentors for helping her along the way.

“If you wanted to be an athletic director, you hung out with athletic directors,” Record said. “If you go to a meeting of the Council of Presidents on behalf of the director of sport, you have not been sitting in the second row, where all the assistants were sitting. You sit at the table and that was scary at times. Most of the time they were all men and they gave you weird looks. Sometimes you had an answer, they would interrupt you, but I think the obstacles were different and I’ve learned so much from the coaches and the student athletes I’ve worked with about the types of obstacles.”

John W. “Billy” Haun, executive director of VHSL, said Thursday’s luncheon was the culmination of a year-long celebration. He said the journey was breathtaking for himself as he went back to learn more about Title IX and its implementation in Virginia.

“I was just amazed and intrigued by the things I learned,” he said. “You go back to the 1950s and 1960s and you look at the Virginia High School League protocol and it talks about girls sports and it’s clearly said in multiple issues and multiple years that these rules that we’re passing now, it’s not are to promote sports. It aims to try and control what is already happening in girls’ sport. Blown me away,” said Haun. “Are you kidding me? But there we were, there we are not.”

But the VHSL was at the forefront in terms of participation. Haun said several former League members were integral to the actual writing of Title IX legislation, which was approved 50 years ago.

“One of the greatest joys I’ve had is just learning about the people who paved the way,” Haun said. “Virginia has played a very important role and helped in this process. We just didn’t start women’s sports in high school in 1972. There were women playing, girls, but it was more like club teams, not recognised [teams]. There were no regional championships or state championships, but we had many pioneers out there, men and women, who promoted and supported women’s sports in our schools in the 1950’s and 1960’s and did that work. It’s just good for me to have the chance to experience who these people are and to be in this room today with some of these people is just fantastic.”

Former Albemarle High School Athletic Director Deb Tyson has a unique perspective on Title IX because she has seen the impact as an athlete, coach and administrator.

“Today was an amazing tribute to 50 years of Title IX,” said Tyson. “It was great to see how far we’ve all come. It was wonderful to have the opportunity to empower the men and women who came before us and had the courage to make a difference. Certainly, the passage of Title IX is worthy of celebration, but passage of a law does not mean that discrimination and inequality will disappear. This is a reminder to all of us that we must keep working together to protect our progress and keep doing and getting better.”

“It was very inspiring,” Record said. “I’ve been in this business for many, many years but you learn something every day and I think today was a wonderful way to celebrate the past, reflect on the future but live in the present. It was very moving. I never in my wildest dreams imagined that I would be back at the University of Virginia, and then to be asked to serve on a Title IX panel I was almost speechless and a bit in awe of the other women in the Space. in addition to the women on the board.”

For Brunelle, she was thrilled to have the opportunity to learn from the amazing women who came before her and helped lay the foundation

“Everyone has a story,” Brunelle said. “I know there are many stories to tell with women, the women who came before me and laid those foundations, and I look forward to sitting back and hearing their stories and hearing what they think about Title IX and as have say it has evolved over the years and learn more about it. I guess it’s easy to say you know what it is to a limited extent, but this was an opportunity to learn about it in much more detail. I think it’s great to step back and hear their stories and understand what it took to lay those foundations as these shifts for women’s rights continued to be pushed, especially in athletics.”

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UPDATE: WECDSB approves $282 million budget for 2022-23 school year https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/update-wecdsb-approves-282-million-budget-for-2022-23-school-year/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 01:25:00 +0000 https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/update-wecdsb-approves-282-million-budget-for-2022-23-school-year/ By Ruby Sweeney June 21, 2022 9:25 p.m The Windsor-Essex English Catholic Schools Board has officially approved $282 million in funding for the upcoming school year. During its June 15 board meeting, the Windsor-Essex Catholic District School Board (WECDSB) approved a balanced budget of $282.4 million to be used for the 2022-2023 school year. The […]]]>


The Windsor-Essex English Catholic Schools Board has officially approved $282 million in funding for the upcoming school year.

During its June 15 board meeting, the Windsor-Essex Catholic District School Board (WECDSB) approved a balanced budget of $282.4 million to be used for the 2022-2023 school year. The budget was presented for a week and returned to trustees on Tuesday when it was subsequently approved.

“Each year we consult closely with our community, and our administration develops a budget based on what our constituents identify as their top concerns for our students,” board chairman Fulvio Valentinis said in a press release. “This year we heard from more than 4,700 people who identified student learning in literacy and math, mental health and students with special needs as their top priorities. We believe this budget addresses all of these concerns,” said Valentinis.

Budget highlights include:

• $2.09 million from the Ontario Supports for Students Fund.

• $3.19 million from the COVID-19 Learning Recovery Fund to support temporary supplemental teachers, early childhood educators, educational assistants and other education workers to address learning recovery.

• $448,847 from student mental health investment.

• $193,741 from Local Priorities for Special Education to support students with special educational needs.

• $78,460 to increase the amount of special equipment per student to provide more assistive technology for students with special educational needs.

The budget is based on projected enrollment of over 20,000 students in 2022-23, an increase of 225 students over estimates for the previous school year.

“With approximately two-thirds of education funding based on enrollment, the increase in enrollment over 2022-23 represents approximately $1.6 million in additional grant revenue for the board, for a total of $281.6 million,” it said it in a statement from the WECDSB.

The school board said the remainder of the budget’s expenses not funded by grants or other revenue sources are funded by the board’s accumulated surplus.

*Correction: A version of this story published on June 15, 2022 said the budget had been approved. The Windsor-Essex Catholic District School Board then clarified that final approval would come at the next Trustees’ meeting on 21 June 2022.

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Interview with Jaclyn Moore: Queer As Folk Season 1 https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/interview-with-jaclyn-moore-queer-as-folk-season-1/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 21:10:00 +0000 https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/interview-with-jaclyn-moore-queer-as-folk-season-1/ The first season of Peacock’s Queer as a people reboot premiered earlier this month and updates Russell T. Davies’ legendary series for a new generation. Spread over 8 episodes, the new iteration of the story introduces a group of LGBTQ friends living in New Orleans and lets the audience witness their reconstruction and rebirth after […]]]>

The first season of Peacock’s Queer as a people reboot premiered earlier this month and updates Russell T. Davies’ legendary series for a new generation. Spread over 8 episodes, the new iteration of the story introduces a group of LGBTQ friends living in New Orleans and lets the audience witness their reconstruction and rebirth after a tragedy that transpired in the first episode.

The ensemble of Queer as a people is diverse in every sense of the word, and the characters’ experiences are suffused with authenticity thanks to a writer’s room dedicated to the lives of real queer people. The narration is directed by Brodie (Devin Way, Grey’s anatomy and train station 19), a high school dropout who returns to New Orleans to fix some fences. Brodie’s circle of friends includes his ex Noah (Johnny Sibilly, Chop), his best friend Ruthie (Jesse James Keitel, big sky) and her partner Shar (freshman CG), his brother Julian (Ryan O’Connell, Special) and his mother Brenda (Kim Cattrall, Sex and the City).

SCREENRANT VIDEO OF THE DAY

See also: Queer As Folk Reboot Cast & Character Guide

screen rant spoke to showrunner Jaclyn Moore (Dear whites) about what sets Queer as a people as an exploration of queer and trans narratives and which characters she felt most connected to.


Queer as Folk - Season 1
Queer As Folk Stonewall Activation – Pictured: (lr) Devin Way; Jesse James Keitel; Jaclyn Moore, executive producer/writer; Johnny Sibilly – (Photo by: Dave Kotinsky/Peacock)

Screen Rant: What was it like working with Stephen and the writers’ room to develop the story?

Jaclyn Moore: It was really wonderful. The pilot script had existed; Stephen had written this beautiful pilot that I fell in love with and [I] was so lucky that he brought me in to work with him on developing the show and breaking and writing the season. We had a great writers room: Roxane Gay. Ryan O’Connell, Brontez Purnell, Des Moran, Azam Mahmood – and our assistants [Maïa Golden, Sarah Link and Alyssa Taylor], who also all got half a script because they were wonderful. You all did a great job.

But to be honest it was such a nice process to break up and tell these stories because I think we all approach it from the same perspective. Our catchphrase in the room was “chaotic”. So often you’re the only one in a writer’s room. As a result, your job uses your identity as a shield against the bad instincts of well-meaning people who steer the queer and trans characters in a bad direction. And in this case it was this beautiful opposite where we were a room full of queer people who got to tell the stories that only we can tell.

Because the truth is I’m so done with art that just seems to argue that we are human; that we are worthy of the base [decency]. My humanity, the humanity of queer people, the humanity of trans people? For me, this is a matter of course at this point. And we’re going to tell a story where these queer and trans characters are messy and complicated and they do fucking stuff and they cheat on people and they lie and they’re selfish and all those things. I don’t know any queer and trans people in my life who aren’t a little bit messy because I don’t know any people in my life who aren’t a little bit messy.

We allow this dignity of chaos; This would complicate cis people of all races and genders. We allow our Don Drapers or our Kerry Washingtons [who plays Olivia Pope] in Scandal or Nancy Botwin in Weeds. We get all of those things, but when it comes to queer people, we’re people’s best friends or a villain who popped by from the ’90s. It feels like, “I thought we’d get over this!” Or we’re just being imposed, holy people who have to [have] Honesty above all to prove that we are worthy of love. I think we can be messy and complicated, and also worthy of love and storytelling. And that’s what this show was about for me.

When working with Stephen, we definitely agreed on that. It was great. It was a great collaboration in the writers’ room and I was able to bring a lot of myself into it. Obviously Ruthie is a character that is a lot of mine. Much of Ruthie’s backstory is my backstory; many of the speeches Ruthie gives are straight out of my life. Also, working with Jesse James Keitel to create this character was a very special experience. It was a wonderful, a wonderful process.

I actually wanted to ask that because it’s such a large cast and yet it’s so impressive that people don’t get lost in the crowd. Of course Ruthie is one, but are there times when you’re fighting for a character to get more screen time or you’re like, “Hey, don’t you forget that storyline?”

Jaclyn Moore: Oh yeah. There are many. Ruthie is, I feel, a baby of mine and Jesse’s and Stephens. But I love Shar; I think CG is one of the biggest.

It’s so hard to choose; You are all so wonderful. I think Shar is such an interesting, complex character. Mingus is certainly someone at a different point in their gender journey and I think that’s really exciting as well. I feel like we don’t have token characters. There are shades; Anyone can be complicated.

We have Marvin and we have Julian – I always say Ryan because he was also one of the writers. We have several queer characters with disabilities. Not to mention Nyle DiMarco and Andrew Gurza – there are so many. [We’re] Freeing people from the weight of just being representative and instead allowing them to be intricate and nuanced. I think that’s the secret of all this.

That’s something I’m thinking about with Dear White People, we could do it too, and that was something I really wanted to bring to bear here as well. The idea of [having] a bunch of everyone so we don’t have to have people say, “Oh, I’m the trans person.” I think this is really something special.

Queer as a people summary


Queer as Folk - Season 1
Queer As Folk – Episode 105 – Image: (lr) Jesse James Keitel as Ruthie, Devin Way as Brodie – (Photo by: Peacock)

Set in New Orleans, the series is a reimagining of the 1999 Channel 4 series created by Russell T Davies and follows a motley group of friends whose lives are changed in the wake of tragedy.

Check out our other interviews with Queer as a people Stars Devin Way & Johnny Sibilly, CG & Jesse James Keitel and Fin Argus & Ryan O’Connell, and creator Stephen Dunn.

More: The 10 Best Shows Like Queer As Folk

All 8 episodes of Queer as a people Season 1 is currently available to stream on Peacock.

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Superintendent recognizes retired teachers and staff | news https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/superintendent-recognizes-retired-teachers-and-staff-news/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 21:00:00 +0000 https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/superintendent-recognizes-retired-teachers-and-staff-news/ WILMINGTON — The school committee received several public comments in support of the negotiations for educational assistants, a proposal for a field trip and the superintendent’s report during its meeting last Wednesday night. Opening the meeting, Superintendent Dr. Glenn Brand to all the teachers and staff retiring this year. He named the retirees in the […]]]>

WILMINGTON — The school committee received several public comments in support of the negotiations for educational assistants, a proposal for a field trip and the superintendent’s report during its meeting last Wednesday night.

Opening the meeting, Superintendent Dr. Glenn Brand to all the teachers and staff retiring this year. He named the retirees in the audience who were able to attend the meeting that evening: Linda Peters, Christine McMenimen, Lynn Morrison, Carol Trulli, Karin Visalli, Cheryl Lesnik, Laura Hilliard, Jane Ferrara, Michelle Yeomelakis – along with Patricia Jeanette, Suzanne Holmes, Sharon Enos, Darlene Sinopoli and Patricia Aloisi, all unable to attend.

Several residents made public statements to express their support for the city’s educational support contract negotiations. The first, Jane Woods, said she had been a teaching assistant for 19 years and struggled to get by financially and pay bills. She asked the committee to recognize her hard work and dedication by completing the contract with a living wage.

The next comment came from Katie Callahan, who shared how she went back to work as a teaching assistant after having her children. She spoke about the experiences and backgrounds of the Wilmington Educational Assistants.

“We wear many hats: doing daily routines, filling in for teachers, helping out in other classrooms, driving around town and helping out at other schools,” she said. “It’s embarrassing to tell the public how little we earn.”

The third educational assistant and resident to speak emphasized the vitality of these positions, saying the staff support will provide the stability and consistency that Wilmington students deserve.

Another resident spoke on this topic, who submitted a petition for living wages for educational assistants with over 900 signatures. She said educational assistants work with students who need special attention and specialized instruction, and fill in for teachers who are often absent. What they want to see in the contract is a respectable salary of at least $30,000 per year, with opportunities for career advancement and development.

The only other public commentator was Jeffrey Cohen, who pointed out that the Safety Subcommittee has not met in the past two years. He also expressed concern at the response to recent gun violence, citing alleged denied requests to lock inner anteroom doors and door barricades. He suggested that the committee indoctrinated students by allowing ideas of diversity, equity, inclusion and gender in schools.

Among the approved items was a request for a field trip to Machu Picchu from two WHS teachers, Megan Burns and Julie Kim. Burns is a Spanish teacher while Kim is a chemistry teacher and leader of the science team. Burns described how the trip would take place during the February 2024 break so students would not miss class time and gave an overview of the trip details.

They both shared how amazing their own time abroad in college was. This trip would be a chance for Spanish students in Wilmington to learn about the culture and practice the language. The cost would be $3,500 per student, but there would be financial aid and fundraising opportunities.

The committee approved the request and expressed how much they appreciated the opportunity to combine science and language and the financial considerations.

They also approved all of the Wilmington Education Foundation technology grants, which David Ragsdale read aloud. These grants were for things like writing and grammar support, iPads, VR headsets, and more.

In the superintendent’s report, Brand included an opportunity to celebrate something good, along with an update to the FY21 budget and a city leadership meeting on school safety. He highlighted WHS World Language teacher Terresa Pietro, who went to Toronto to complete the Fulbright Teachers for Global Classrooms international field experience. He also offered a salute to the graduating seniors and any colleges they would be attending next year, particularly a number of collegiate athletes.

Deputy Finance Director Paul Ruggiero shared the findings of the fiscal year-end 2021 report, one of which was that the city had received funding for cleaning products, allowing those costs to be reimbursed to schools.

The last thing Brand spoke about was what he called a joint city meeting on school safety. He mentioned how he received questions from the community about how the school district is responding to school safety in buildings. So he wanted to start a conversation between community leaders and partners like the city manager, the chair of the special committee, the police chief and the fire chief. The meeting was scheduled for this week – June 16 at 11 am

However, the meeting would not be public.

“Whatever comes out of these meetings needs to be carefully and thoughtfully socialized,” Brand continued.

He explained that a single meeting would not be enough to address the issue. Ragsdale assured the audience that feedback would be sought from families and staff before any changes were made and that there would be discussion and transparency throughout the process.

The Chair Dr. Jenn Bryson clarified that all school doors are locked during the day, but they are unsure if they should always be locked or if schools should be monitored during after-school events.

In the subcommittee reports, Bryson shared that the Superintendent Evaluation Subcommittee was in session and almost finished consolidating all of the evaluations into a single narrative. They would bring a presentation for the next meeting.

Melissa Plowman also mentioned a CPAC meeting the following evening.

The next school board meeting is scheduled for June 22 at 7 p.m

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Dungeons & Dragons personalities Satine Phoenix and Jamison Stone accused of bullying and abuse https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/dungeons-dragons-personalities-satine-phoenix-and-jamison-stone-accused-of-bullying-and-abuse/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 21:00:00 +0000 https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/dungeons-dragons-personalities-satine-phoenix-and-jamison-stone-accused-of-bullying-and-abuse/ A couple of familiar faces within the dungeons The streaming community is facing a number of allegations related to the treatment of employees on various projects. Over the past few days, over a dozen former employees have spoken out against Satine Phoenix and Jamison Stone, two commonly seen influencers who have appeared on numerous Pages […]]]>

A couple of familiar faces within the dungeons The streaming community is facing a number of allegations related to the treatment of employees on various projects. Over the past few days, over a dozen former employees have spoken out against Satine Phoenix and Jamison Stone, two commonly seen influencers who have appeared on numerous Pages dungeons streaming shows and has worked with the likes of Wizards of the Coast, Origins Game Fair and Geek & Sundry. These allegations paint a pattern of mistreatment, bullying and gaslighting, along with threats of blacklisting and manipulation.

Phoenix was one of the first prominent online streamers to emerge in growth dungeons Scene in the late 2010s. your shipment The Sirens of the Empire was watching dungeons official streaming channel, and Phoenix worked at Wizards of the Coast as a community manager for dungeons for at least a year. Phoenix has worked with numerous household names in the dungeons community, including Matt Mercer and Luke Gygax, the son of dungeons Co-founder Gary Gygax.

In recent years, Phoenix has performed frequently with Jamison Stone, a self-published author. The pair frequently make sponsored appearances together at conventions, shows, and signings, including a sponsorship where the pair travel to GameStop stores to play dungeons with the customers. Phoenix and Stone organized a crowdfunding campaign for Sirens: Battle of the Bards, one yet to be published dungeons Adventure/Rulebook published by Apotheosis Studios, which was founded by Stone. Phoenix appears on the cover of the book and the pair added miniatures depicting their likenesses as add-ons. The Kickstarter for sirens Raised over $300,000. A separate Kickstarter for The Red Opera: The Last Days of the Sorcerer Raised over $160,000 on Kickstarter. While both books were overwritten by Phoenix and Stone’s involvement, Apotheosis Studios brought in teams of freelancers to collaborate on the book. Phoenix and Stone also had a public wedding ceremony at GaryCon earlier this year, which was attended by streamers including Jason C. Miller, Becca Scott, and Amy Vorphal. Stone and Phoenix have also been announced as special guests headlining Origins Game Fair, a celebrity tabletop show organized by Game Manufacturers of America.

Over the past week, both Stone and Phoenix have been accused of mistreating employees, co-workers and freelancers, often with threats of ruining their professional careers. The first allegation came from Chad Rowe, a tattoo artist who worked with Post Malone and collaborated with Stone on a tattoo in 2020. Rowe shared screenshots of a dialogue with Stone and Phoenix about an artwork use contract. Stone berates Rowe in the shared screenshots, at one point prompting Rowe to send him a written apology letter for their interactions.

Soon after, several other employees came forward about their own interactions with Stone and Phoenix at work sirens. In addition to similar allegations of bullying and mistreatment, several employees also noted that Stone had publicly “blacklisted” them after they were instructed to send invoices for work done on the book. Employees claim they were eventually paid, but only on the basis of a “post-edit” word count, which is not industry standard. Jessica Marcrum’s report, a notable tabletop designer, can be seen below:

Elisa Teague, a longtime tabletop designer who attended Phoenix and Stone’s public wedding ceremony at GaryCon, also stated that she was not paid for her work sirens.

Other employees came forward citing similar treatment The Red Opera. Pat Edwards, one of the writers on this project, describes his experience below, noting that as Stone took more and more control, the band DiAmorte was essentially pushed out of the project, with Edwards’ share and salary threatened for overruling Stone’s decisions in had asked.

One of the most harrowing reports came from Tristan Morris, who spoke at PAX West about his experience with Phoenix and Stone after his employer paid Okta for the pair to come to the show and speak to gaming companies about cybersecurity. Morris opened up about how the couple treated him and colleague Katie DeMatteis as assistants, despite arranging for the couple to attend PAX West and stream on their behalf.

Stone eventually released a public apology to Rowe, the tattoo artist who first addressed the issue on Twitter, and said he’s been working to change his behavior, which he attributes to “complex post-traumatic stress disorder” since their interactions in 2020. Jason Azevado, the founder of streaming network RealmSmith TV, noted that his behavior lasted just last month. Azevado revealed that Stone and Phoenix verbally abused workers at Satine’s Quest, a themed cruise organized by the duo. Azevado also claimed that Stone attempted to use RealmSmith’s sponsorship of the cruise to bill Norwegian Cruise Line an additional $20,000, of which only $5,000 went to RealmSmith.

Due to the numerous allegations and reports, Stone announced that he had resigned from Apotheosis Studios earlier this week. Although Stone was removed from the Origins guest list, Phoenix continued to perform at the show throughout the weekend. After that, Origins Game Fair sent out an email stating that “staff has assessed that there is no immediate risk of physical harm” and presented a revised release schedule for Phoenix.

While Stone has been the focus of many allegations, Phoenix is ​​also mentioned with the same demeanor. Additionally, other reports are emerging of her actively blacklisting at least one tabletop pro, which took place at the Stream of Many Eyes, a D&D live/streaming event that took place in 2018. In the following thread, Liisa Lee claimed Phoenix bullied her to lead the Stream of Many Eyes, including at least one incident that happened on camera.

ComicBook.com also learned that Phoenix is ​​being sued by its former employee Ruty Rutenberg. Rutenberg and Phoenix ran the streaming network Maze Arcana until dark in 2018. According to the lawsuit, published on the Los Angeles County Superior Court website, Rutenberg’s Routine accuses Anomaly LLC of Phoenix embezzling $40,000 of Maze Arcana’s money and taking the money to personal accounts and helping run the channel. That money was never returned to Maze Arcana, which led to the lawsuit. That lawsuit is pending and Phoenix has filed a counterclaim alleging breach of oral contract and breach of fiduciary duty.

Yesterday, Phoenix responded to the allegations, saying she was sorry for “being the cause” of her accuser’s pain and enabling Stone’s “horrific behavior.”

Since the allegations became public, Level Up Dice has announced that they are canceling a planned collaboration with Apotheosis Studios. D&D In a Castle, a company that offers vacation packages featuring D&D games set in European castles, has also removed Phoenix from its website and states that they will not be working with Stone and Phoenix in the future. Jasper’s Game Day, a charity that raises money through D&D streaming, announced that Phoenix has been removed from their advisory board and that the pair will not be invited to attend future Jasper’s Game Day events. Additionally, podcaster and TTRPG personality Travis McElroy stated that they would no longer be collaborating with them in the future.

Wizards of the Coast declined to comment on this story. ComicBook.com has also reached out to Phoenix for comment on the allegations, but has not received a response as of press time.

EDIT: This article has been updated to indicate that Phoenix has filed a countersuit against Rutenberg.

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The Next Great Champ hopes to become a best-selling author https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/the-next-great-champ-hopes-to-become-a-best-selling-author/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 17:24:13 +0000 https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/the-next-great-champ-hopes-to-become-a-best-selling-author/ Otis Griffin’s ability as an athlete cannot be questioned. He played professional football and also captured the NABO light heavyweight title as a boxer after winning FOX’s reality boxing series. The next great champion. Now Griffin hopes to have similar success as a writer. He recently published his first novel, A change of hearts. He […]]]>

Otis Griffin’s ability as an athlete cannot be questioned. He played professional football and also captured the NABO light heavyweight title as a boxer after winning FOX’s reality boxing series. The next great champion.

Now Griffin hopes to have similar success as a writer. He recently published his first novel, A change of hearts.

He started his journey as a writer on the reality show. In his free time, he wrote several screenplays that he kept hidden for years until his sister convinced him to write a book. After teaming up with Ross Williams, Griffin’s book was published by Williams Commerce publishers in May. After writing several screenplays, he hopes to turn A change of hearts and some of his other writings in films. The transition from boxer to writer was smooth, he says, and he hopes to use it as a new career path.

The champion details his ambitions as a writer for Zenger News, describes his near-death experience, and more.

Motivated by doors being slammed in his face and the grief of losing both brothers, Otis Griffin aspires to become a best-selling author.
Courtesy of Otis Griffin via Zenger

Zenger: How is everything going?

Griffin: Everything is fine. I don’t know if you know that earlier this month [May], I almost died. I had blood clots in my lungs and heart and didn’t know it. I passed out right here and kicked it with my fiancé and future brother-in-law. They took me to the emergency room and found I had blood clots. Then, three weeks later, my son graduates from Fresno State. He becomes a chiropractor. Between that time, the book, and all that stuff, I just think, look how good God is. The enemy came to take all of that from me, and then you look around and it’s a testimony, you know.

Zenger: Are you in good health?

Griffin: Oh yes! All is well. I don’t make blood clots hereditary. I only made a conscious decision to stay on blood thinners forever because I first got a blood clot from a car accident in 2017. You should be gone. They were supposed to keep me on blood thinners for a year, but they said, ‘You’re young and healthy. You don’t have to take her, let’s put her down.” It was only after six months and I didn’t feel safe about it, but they did it anyway. In the end they came back, I think it’s because of the vaccination. They say only Johnson & Johnson causes clots, but I think if one of them causes clots, they all do (laughs).

Otis Griffin
Otis Griffin, the boxer-turned-author, hopes his books will be made into movies.
Courtesy of Otis Griffin via Zenger

Zenger: No rest for the weary, because now you have a book to promote, A change of hearts. Tell us about the book.

Griffin: I’m on the reality show The next great champion Set, and there are so many people living the Hollywood life, so I had future directors and producers…the cinematographers and everything around me. They are hungry. They are personal assistants. In between you go to the catering and they stop to talk.

I’m a people watcher, so I listen. They talk about how to write a screenplay. So I asked one of them how I would go about writing a screenplay. My minor is journalism. I’m just trying to kill time because my free time was watching paint dry when I’m not reading the Bible. I took this mock script, duplicated it and added my own story. After a while I think this is developing pretty well.

So, about 3 months later, I show it to one of the producers, and [he said]: “That’s good. You wrote that?” I told him: “Yes!” He said, “I can get you $3,000 to $5,000 for it now.” I forgot what movie it was, but that was when Will Smith was doing the BET Awards and stuff like that, and he was making $22 million a movie. I said, “Wait a minute, if this movie gets the right actors, it’s going to make millions of dollars. Do I get royalties?” He says, “That can be debated, but most likely not. They’re going to want you to sign it and not be bound.” I kept it.

Lo and behold, God is always good. … I’ve written eight of those things – screenplays that have been sitting there, actually under my bed, for years. My cousin Patrice wrote her book; She encouraged me, “You can also easily write a book.” …. “However” [was my response, but] I sent some stuff to Ross [Williams] and he said, “I love it.” I thought he was going to gas me. She said, “No, if you can’t write, he would turn you away and not even think about it.” We walked from there and it was beautiful. A great experience all the way.

Otis Griffin A Heartbreak Book
A Change of Hearts is the first of many books former light heavyweight champion Otis Griffin plans to publish.
Courtesy of Otis Griffin via Zenger

Zenger: How was the transition from boxing to writing romance for you?

Griffin: I’m a jack of all trades. My major was Psychology and my minor was Journalism, so I’ve always had an aspiration to be the athlete you see sport Center that went into the announcement. Writing and journalism have always been there. If you know me like my family and close friends [do]I always make up stories in my head for comedic reasons.

My mind works differently than other people. I’m always dreaming and making alternative situations out of things. Even when things got difficult, looking back, several doors were slammed in my face. From the NFL, difficulties like losing my two brothers and things like that. The abstract perspective allows me to survive.

Zenger: Could you give a preview of the book?

Griffin: The title is a metaphor for the story. We all find ourselves in situations in our lives where we either need a change of heart or the highest will force us to change our hearts. That’s one thing I want people to get out of the story. It’s like poker – if you don’t fold your hand in life, you never know where it will take you. Look at me. Nearly dead earlier this month, I’m now the proud father of a college graduate and author. You never know what kind of change of heart you might have. You don’t know what kind of decisions are being made in your life that can be affected by either a wave or a tidal wave.

Otis Griffin
Otis Griffin used the lessons he learned from college journalism courses to write his first book, A Change of Hearts.
Courtesy of Otis Griffin via Zenger

If people sit down and read this story, they’ll see a couple of facets: It’s a story about women’s empowerment. Any woman who is American, not even by color or creed, just American, will understand this girl’s plight. And then the other thing is, it’s a story that makes us realize that we’re all Americans. I tell people all the time that we’re supposed to be the free country, but we’re the only country that has pockets of civilization from other countries in our country. If you’re Italian American, only hang out in the area where Italians hang out. If you are Nigerian, hang where Nigerians hang, even though you call yourself American. Even if you have probably never touched Nigeria or haven’t been there for a long time.

Besides that, when we go to other countries…this happened to me in Canada. I went to Montreal. It was me and three other people; We’re the only black dots up there. I’m like, “Hey, what’s up!” They looked at me like I was crazy and walked away. The guy driving me around is West African. I thought, ‘What’s the matter with your people? You have to do this to me a few more times and I won’t talk to you anymore.” He [said]: “OG listen, when I want to introduce myself to people, I walk over to them and tell them my name and say nice to meet you. If I yell from across the street, they think I’m crazy. “

“We are all Africans,” I said. He says: “No, you are not African. When I look at you, I see Indians, I see white. You are American. Your passport says you’re an American. I thought, “Whoa!” I’ve been to about five different continents, so people look at me differently every time I travel. Either they keep you on a high pedestal, you’re American, you’re better than us even though we’re all black, or they’re distant because they think you’re a snooty American. Not to stray too far, but this story will show you that we are all Americans.

Zenger: Where can you buy the book?

Griffin: Amazon. Hopefully it’s moving towards the bestseller list now.

Zenger: You want to film this novel, right?

Griffin: Yes! I have my boy, Bruce Nahin, the inventor of the Chippendale dancers. He will buy it for me. It was already a script, so I just have to change it again. We’re going to make enough of a splash to get this film deal done and move on to bigger and better things.

I have so much more in the shoot that is coming out. I have another book, called Loose cannon, who will be a modern private detective. “Loose” will be a series that many people will fall in love with.

This story was provided to Newsweek by Zenger News.

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PTAB Strategies and Insights Newsletter: May 2022: Split panel weighs general skepticism differently in obviousness study | Stars, Kessler, Goldstein & Fox PLLC https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/ptab-strategies-and-insights-newsletter-may-2022-split-panel-weighs-general-skepticism-differently-in-obviousness-study-stars-kessler-goldstein-fox-pllc/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 14:33:39 +0000 https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/ptab-strategies-and-insights-newsletter-may-2022-split-panel-weighs-general-skepticism-differently-in-obviousness-study-stars-kessler-goldstein-fox-pllc/ In a recent statement by the Federal Court of Justice Auris Health, Inc. v. Intuitive Surgical Operations, Inc., Case 2021-1732, the panel split on the weight of general industry skepticism in an evidence analysis and disagreed on whether it should be weighted in the main evidence analysis or only as part of the secondary consideration […]]]>

In a recent statement by the Federal Court of Justice Auris Health, Inc. v. Intuitive Surgical Operations, Inc., Case 2021-1732, the panel split on the weight of general industry skepticism in an evidence analysis and disagreed on whether it should be weighted in the main evidence analysis or only as part of the secondary consideration analysis. In the separate decision, Judge Prost, writing for the majority, cleared the case and remanded the case back to the board, believing that general industry skepticism alone is not enough to disprove the obvious. Slip Op., p. 7

In this case, there are five claims relating to the exchange of instruments for surgical robotic systems. Slip Op., p. 2. Auris requested adversarial examination of Intuitive’s allegations as not patentable because of obviousness. ID. Auris claimed that Smith and Faraz are prior art references, with Smith being directed to a remote exoskeleton controller for a robotic surgical system and Faraz to an adjustable support stand holding surgical instruments. Slip Op., p. 3-4 In the Board’s final written decision, the Board “determined that the combination of prior art asserted by Auris [] any limitation of the contested claims disclosed.” Slip Op., p. 3. However, the parties disputed whether “a professional would have been motivated to combine the references”. ID. Auris argued that “a skilled craftsman would be motivated to combine [the references] to reduce the number of assistants needed during the operation[,]’ while Intuitive argued that there would have been no motivation for a combination due to general industry skepticism because ‘surgeons were skeptical about performing robotic surgery’. Slip Op., p. 5. The board sided with Intuitive on this issue and concluded that there was a lack of motivation for a merger and Auris appealed the decision. Slip Op., p. 2.

Here, for the sake of clarity, the majority has framed their analysis in terms of a “should have” question – “[t]The study on combination motivation asks whether an experienced craftsman “not only could have made the combinations, but would have been motivated to do so. . . of the prior art to arrive at the claimed invention.” Belden Inc. v. Berk-Tek LLC, 805 F.3d 1064, 1073 (Federal Circ. 2015).” Slip Op., 5 (emphasis added). The majority then formulated the skepticism inquiry only as a secondary consideration question and a question requiring the skepticism to be “specific to the invention, not general to the field”. Slip Op., 6. The court found that while the board “acknowledged Intuitive’s vague opinion that at the time of invention there was great skepticism about performing telesurgery” to find “an experienced craftsman,” “not compelled.” would have been to further complicate Smith’s system’” which was not sufficient for the board to establish the non-obvious. ID. Unwilling to make a finding of fact on concurrent evidence affecting the purpose of the combined reprimands, the court of first instance was vacated and remanded in custody. ID.

In contrast, Justice Reyna disagreed with at least two premises of the majority decision: (1) that the general skepticism of the industry can never support the finding that there is no motivation to combine, and (2) the majority’s “inflexible and rigid” view that ” it ‘inadmissible’ for the Board to consider evidence of craftsmen’s skepticism about robotic surgery in determining the motivation for the combination.” Slip-Op. Contradiction, 2-3.

First, the dissent provided a detailed list of expert testimonies submitted to the board, noting that each piece of evidence met the essential standard of proof and should be used to support the board’s decision on non-obviousness. Ibid, 2.

Second, the dissent discussed why the majority categorization of skepticism as a secondary inquiry is wrong. Id., at 4. More than that, why the delegation of the majority’s investigation of the secondary consideration of being of lesser value than the investigation of the core evidence was wrong. ID. For the latter, Judge Reyna drew on three cases to show that all four Graham factors carry equal weight in the obviousness investigation: Apple Inc. versus Samsung Elecs. Co., 839 F.3d 1034, 1048 (Fed. Cir. 2016) (en banc) (“A determination of whether a claim is patently invalid under Section 103 requires consideration of all four Graham factors, and it is a Errors come to an obvious conclusion until all these factors are taken into account.”); Pro-Mold & Tool Co. v. Great Lakes Plastics, Inc., 75 F.3d 1568, 1573 (Fed. Cir. 1996) (“It is the secondary considerations that are often most conclusive and determinative of the ultimate conclusion of obviousness or non-obviousness. The district court has no reason stated that ProMold’s evidence for sub-considerations was apparently disregarded; this was an error of law.”); and Mintz v. Dietz & Watson, Inc., 679 F.3d 1372, 1378 (Fed. Cir. 2012) (“These objective guides are powerful tools for courts faced with the difficult task of avoiding unconscious reliance on hindsight.”) .

Bring away:

When evidence of industry skepticism is presented to show a lack of motivation to combine references, this case suggests that the best course of action is to present skepticism specific to the invention and in combination with other evidence that one Show a lack of motivation to combine.

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Center for Advanced Legal Studies, Training and Research, MNLU Mumbai https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/center-for-advanced-legal-studies-training-and-research-mnlu-mumbai/ Tue, 31 May 2022 06:30:29 +0000 https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/center-for-advanced-legal-studies-training-and-research-mnlu-mumbai/ The center runs with threefold goals: 1. Advanced legal studies The center aims to facilitate the advanced study of law for students, professionals, research scholars and all stakeholders in society through various sources such as academic programs including advanced short-term and long-term certificate courses, diplomas and degrees, and specializations in various contemporary and advanced subjects […]]]>

The center runs with threefold goals:

1. Advanced legal studies

The center aims to facilitate the advanced study of law for students, professionals, research scholars and all stakeholders in society through various sources such as academic programs including advanced short-term and long-term certificate courses, diplomas and degrees, and specializations in various contemporary and advanced subjects in law .

2. Legal education

The additional goal of the center is the theoretical and practical training of students, professionals, research scientists, companies, investigative agencies and other leaders with the help, support and advice of various experts in the field and luminaries working in the profession or any institution and academic and research institutions, various government agencies.

3. Legal Research

Encouraging and promoting high-quality, high-standard legal research is one of the Centre’s main objectives. The center organizes various seminars, webinars, symposiums and conferences and invites presentations and publications on various contemporary, progressive and trend-setting topics in the field of law. This center offers advice, support and guidance to those who are really in need and also aims to help society in the search for social justice by spreading legal awareness through various socio-legal programs in different social structures that by educational institutions, professional associations, government agencies and for the common people in society. All activities related to legal research, training, studies and consulting are carried out independently and in cooperation and coordination of different centers running under the MNLU.

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Five questions with Chronixx | entertainment https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/five-questions-with-chronixx-entertainment/ Fri, 27 May 2022 05:26:54 +0000 https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/five-questions-with-chronixx-entertainment/ If roots reggae star Chronixx’s music doesn’t give it away, the dedication he has put into participating in righteous causes nationally and globally shows he is on a mission of upliftment. Writing, singing, producing and performing music that resonates with people is part of Chronixx’s everyday life, but through his foundation Caring Hands of Rastafari […]]]>

If roots reggae star Chronixx’s music doesn’t give it away, the dedication he has put into participating in righteous causes nationally and globally shows he is on a mission of upliftment. Writing, singing, producing and performing music that resonates with people is part of Chronixx’s everyday life, but through his foundation Caring Hands of Rastafari (CHOR) he is charged with several missions, from funding and participating in educational projects to protecting the world’s oceans and wildlife.

Chronixx has an extraordinary track record in the highly competitive music industry – but he’s not boasting. It’s not a word he likes or keeps as part of his vocabulary. while he sings “Dweet fi the love, me nuh dweet fi di likes, success nuh comes overnight, mek dem knowledge a substance about hype”. Music is a lifestyle and Chronixx continues a musical legacy. Revealed as a child by his father Chronicle, Chronixx has embraced the responsibility he has been given to lead by example.

While embarking on another project, the musician is focusing on the health and wellness sector and is an ambassador for The Answer, a herbal medicine and collection of natural products created by St. Lucian Herbal Physician Kailash Leonce. He’s also preparing for a busy summer season as he anticipates a successful launch of the JamCoders program. The Computer Science Summer Camp starts on July 4th and was inspired by AddisCoder, a free intensive 4-week summer camp focusing on programming and algorithms in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Chronixx enlightens people and informs them about his daily comings and goings this week five questions

How and why did you decide to become an ambassador for a herbal medicine brand?

And you know [it] It is generally important that during times when people are unsure how to maintain their immunity at a higher level, people know how to maintain a strong functioning immunity. And a recognized way is to use our own herbs but make them easily accessible through concentration [it] into what we have called The Answer.

What do you think is needed to make the information more accessible?

I feel that we, especially as Rastafarians, need to shoulder the expense and labor to bring this knowledge more to the public, as well as the products derived from our own herbs that are found in our countryside here across the region are native and in Africa in general. That’s one thing that Rastafarians do more of.

When it comes to health and wellness, there are still many men who have failed to appreciate the importance or who lack focus…

I don’t support the narrative that men tend to be like this or women tend to be like that [that] or any form of rhetoric. I think people in general don’t really know, and it’s because of civilization and human development that has brought us to this place where the knowledge of taking care of yourself is hidden from general public knowledge. Knowledge of the herbs and how they can help us achieve a state of balance also remains largely hidden from the general public. This is really humanity [striving] to become more responsible about how we maintain our health and well-being. People also need to take more time for themselves; You can be comfortable or uncomfortable, and many people experience discomfort and go through the difficulties of this condition, but taking time for yourself is always the first step to a full physiological reset, and even a psychological and mental reset where this is the case the case is the origin of the disease of many people. Many physical ailments, with the exception of injuries, most diseases that we go through are due to mental imbalance, mental and psychological illnesses.

How do you make time for yourself?

It’s 24 hours a day, 365 days… you have to take some of them. The 7 days in a strong, as Rastaman says for the Sabbath, lasts from sundown on Friday to sundown on Saturday. It’s that kind of sabbatical, a rhythmic practice of taking time for yourself. Meditation is time I spend with myself. You can find someone like me in nature and with my family, because that is still taken for granted. Take even more care of yourself, check your heartbeat and if you notice anything unusual call someone with a higher knowledge of how to balance human physiology. That’s what Priest Kailash was to me.

In the end, you have to structure your time so that you can keep that rhythm. For me, one of the things I do is keep it independent and internal so that if necessary, in our own interest, we can defer it enough to take care of ourselves.

What should people expect next from Chronixx?

Don’t expect anything from me (laughs). I don’t have high expectations myself. I do these kinds of things that come from rehearsals. We are working to bring The Answer to the general public. Everything else is my daily routine, writing a lot of songs, it’s my vitality. I mean I make music every day, rehearse every day and people are banging on what you’re doing. I just published never give up and the focus is on continuing that production and songwriting process. We do that with Forever Living Originals from Great Britain. They’ve been my family for a long time and have always been making music Cool as the breeze. For myself, I still don’t want to tell people I’m working on this or that, but I’m working. JamCoders Computer Science Summer Camp at the University of the West Indies, Mona, July 4-29 will welcome 50 students from across the island to learn programming and artificial intelligence from faculty from Harvard and UC Berkeley…teaching assistants from all of them Countries around the world just trying to do some positive work for the summer. The registration deadline was May 22nd, but it will be an annual thing and we are just starting out on a lot of things.

stephanie.lyew@gleanerjm.com

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Sutradhara’s Tales: On the Trail of Paper Making in Pune, in Word and Spirit https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/sutradharas-tales-on-the-trail-of-paper-making-in-pune-in-word-and-spirit/ Wed, 25 May 2022 10:48:33 +0000 https://best-custom-essay-writing.net/sutradharas-tales-on-the-trail-of-paper-making-in-pune-in-word-and-spirit/ Documents and records are one of the most tangible creations of the Middle Ages, providing us with crucial evidence to understand various aspects of administration and governance in days gone by. State records for Pune, which began as copperplate grants in the 8th century AD, grow enormously in the Middle Ages due to the introduction […]]]>

Documents and records are one of the most tangible creations of the Middle Ages, providing us with crucial evidence to understand various aspects of administration and governance in days gone by. State records for Pune, which began as copperplate grants in the 8th century AD, grow enormously in the Middle Ages due to the introduction of paper and papermaking.

The Pune Archives, also known as Peshwe Daftar, houses more than 40 million documents from the 18th and 19th centuries. But what do we know about the medium of paper on which these records were written, and where did it come from?

Paper was first made in China in 105 AD. I-Tsing, the Chinese traveler who visited India on pilgrimage, states that he had no paper to record and translate the Sanskrit Buddhist texts. He observes that Indians wrote on either bhurja-patra (birch bark) or taad-patra (palm leaves), processed specifically for the purpose.

Papermaking technology was learned by the Arabs from Chinese captives captured in an attack on Samarkand in 751 AD. This art of papermaking eventually spread throughout Europe and India in the 18th century through the mediation of Islamic rulers. Muslim rulers used paper extensively as a writing material and one of the oldest paper manuscripts in India is found from Gujarat, dating to 1223-1224 AD.

The art of papermaking was introduced to the Deccan some 700 years ago by Mohammad bin Tughlaq when he moved the capital from Delhi to Daulatabad. A small settlement between Daulatabad and Khultabad was established and called Kagazipura where paper making was in full swing. Papermaking continues to this day and follows the traditional methods of handmade papermaking.

As the need for documentation and records increased, paper became the most preferred medium. The raw material for paper production in the form of various natural fibers was also readily available.

Shaiste Khan descended into the Deccan with a huge army of 40-50 thousand soldiers. And when he conquered Pune in May 1660, he made Lal Mahal, the former residence of Shivaji Maharaj, his base.

The original Kasba Peth, Shahapura and Somwar were not sufficient to meet the needs of his military camp. Hence, Khan settled a new Peth, Shastapura, also known as Astapura, along the river and beyond the Nagjhari stream, which is present-day Mangalwar-Peth.

The military also attracted various artisan communities to settle in Pune. Prominent among them were shikalgars (weapons makers) and kagajis (paper artists). A separate Kagadipura was settled east of Kasba for paper making. Water is an essential requirement for papermaking, especially for multiple wash cycles, and was available near the river. No wonder Kagadipura was settled on the banks of the Mutha River.

The various types of papers known during the Maratha period are named according to their region of manufacture or by use or community. For example, “Habsani” or “Hapshani” paper was imported from Abyssinia, Africa, or made by Habshis (Abyssinians) on the Konkan Coast near Janjira. Similarly, “Madgadi” paper may be named after Fort Madgad near Diveagar in Raigad District.

“Hareri” was the paper made in the city of Harihar, a major paper-making center in Mysore, Karnataka. “Daulatabadi”, as the name suggests, was made in Kagazipura near Fort Daulatabad. “Firangani” and “Portugali” are the papers imported from Portugal. The paper made in Junnar was coveted for its quality and was known as “Junnari Kagad”. “Shastakhani” was the name given to paper made in Kagadipura paper mills in Shastapura Peth of Kasbe Pune. The prominent cities like Aurangabad, Junnar Pune, which were home to craftsmen engaged in paper making, became ambiguously known as “Kagadipuras”.

“Parabshai” was a paper exclusively used and preferred by Prabhu or the Parab community engaged in clerical work. “Tiklidar” was fine quality paper decorated with silver and gold dots, while “Buttedar” was paper decorated with silver and gold motifs all over the surface.

The Jasoods (spies) in the Maratha period became known as “Kagadi” as they carried paper letters back and forth as part of undercover activities.

The Peshwas revived papermaking in Pune in 1783 by specially inviting the paper artisan Allibhai to Pune. He and his assistants were given free residence in Kasba Peth and eventually settled in Pune. Her tribe continued to grow as the demand for paper increased, thus continuing the legacy of Kagadipura, founded in the same place in the 17th century. During the 18th century, about 40 production units or kagaz karkhana operated in Kagadipura. However, in 1885 they were reduced to just eight due to slacking local demand. Of these, seven were in Kagadipura and one in Bhamburda on the other side of the Mutha River. Today, most of the units have disappeared or been replaced by modern machinery, but the place name remains due to the prominent presence of the Kagadipura Masjid. The area is also home to “Juna Kalbhairav”, a forgotten city deity of Pune.

The paper made in the Pune factories was quite strong and durable. The cities of Nasik and Junnar also housed paper-making units. But the process differed significantly; Cloth fabrics were used to make paper at both locations, while the Pune units recycled the discarded scraps of paper. In the past, ropes, cords, coco coir and jute burlap were used as fibers for papermaking. But it required excess labor to beat the bundles and wash the fibers.

Six main instruments were used as tools in this type of papermaking. A large hammer was known as a “Dhegi” or “Dang”. Various types of “chalnya” (sevens) were used as “thing” or paper forms to drain excess liquid. “Chapari” was the bamboo frame for holding and supporting the papier-mâché and for drying. A large, rounded, pebble-shaped block of agate called “Shilemani” was used to refine and polish the paper’s surface. “Kavade” or large shells were often used. This would make the paper surface smooth and easy to write on.

The quality of the handmade paper from the Maratha world was superior to that imported from Europe as it lasted long, did not break with age, held the ink better and did not allow the ink to fade even after 300 years.

Although making paper by hand is a laborious process, this historic art has been revived in the modern age and is finding new connoisseurs through ventures like the Handmade factory at Agriculture College.

Saili Palande-Datar is an Indologist, environmentalist, historian and farmer. She can be reached at sailikdatar@gmail.com

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