The organization in Cincinnati makes business cards to help the visually impaired

The world’s largest braille manufacturer is based in College Hill at the Clovernook Center for the Blind and Visually Impaired. Ryan Miller is pleased to be part of a partnership with TriHealth to develop business cards for healthcare professionals that have a special touch. “Someone gives you a business card that is usually a print card that is inaccessible to the blind,” said Miller. “Anything you see and take for granted.” The new cards have four points so that the visually impaired can find the QR code on the card. “I will try to center the camera over these four points.. Contact me. So I got it right away,” Miller WLWT showed. Then a screen reader on your phone called Voice Over will read it aloud. Miller is one of the proofreaders on the project, making sure the braille matches the print. TriHealth and Clovernook believe this is just the beginning for companies looking for a way to be more inclusive. “I hope this is the beginning of this change to bring an equivalent experience to everyone who accesses their services,” said Samuel Foulkes, director of Braille Production and Accessible Innovation. “Makes individuals feel welcome and at home and thinks that people with disabilities encounter unnecessary challenges in trying to feel part of organizations,” said Tashawna Otabil, TriHealth’s chief diversity and inclusion officer. Miller said it was a good start, and he already has ideas on how it could be rolled out to other large companies. “We could even do this for the meal set service I told you about because they use scan-to-cook technology,” said Miller Ideas leading him to his true passion: people feel connected.

The largest Braille manufacturer in the world is based in College Hill at the Clovernook Center for the Blind and Visually Impaired.

Ryan Miller is excited to be part of a partnership with TriHealth to create specialty business cards for healthcare professionals.

“Someone gives you a business card that is usually a print card that is inaccessible to the blind,” Miller said. “Anything you see and take for granted.”

The new cards have four dots so that the visually impaired can also find the QR code on the card.

“I’m going to try to center the camera over those four points … contact contact. So she picked it up right away,” Miller told WLWT.

Then a screen reader on your phone called Voice Over will read it aloud.

Miller is one of the proofreaders on the project, making sure the braille matches the print. TriHealth and Clovernook believe this is just the beginning for companies looking for a way to be more inclusive.

“I hope this is the beginning of this change to bring an equal experience to everyone who accesses their services,” said Samuel Foulkes, director of braille production and accessible innovation.

“Makes individuals feel welcome and at home and thinks that people with disabilities go through challenges unnecessarily when trying to feel like part of organizations,” said Tashawna Otabil, TriHealth’s chief diversity and inclusion officer.

Miller said it was a good start and that he already had ideas on how it could be rolled out to other large companies.

“We could even do this for the meal set service I told you about because they use scan-to-cook technology,” Miller said.

A wealth of ideas leads him to his true passion: people feel connected.


Source link

Comments are closed.